IRS tax forms - Government Shutdown

Despite Continued Government Shutdown, Some IRS Employees Are Being Called Back To Work

Despite Continued Government Shutdown, Some IRS Employees Are Being Called Back To Work

Temporary funding for the IRS for fiscal year 2019 expired at midnight on December 21, 2018. We previously reported how the government shutdown is impacting IRS operations – click here. That initial contingency plan contemplated that the shutdown would last no more than 5 days and involved furlough of 88% of the IRS workforce (totals approximately 87,000) leaving only 9,946 that are allowed to continue working.

Under an updated contingency plan covering the upcoming filing season, the IRS will recall 57% of its workforce to handle tax season duties increasing the number of IRS employees to 46,052 that are now allowed to work. The new plan will allow the IRS to process paper and electronic returns and issue refunds to taxpayers and adhere to its commitment that tax season will start on January 28, 2019 despite an ongoing government shutdown.

The date when funding will be restored by Congress has not been established but under plans established by each Federal agency, as the lapse in funding continues more Federal government functions will be shutdown.

The Anti-Deficiency Act.

Overriding each Federal agency’s plan is the Anti-Deficiency Act, 31 U.S.C. §1341, which provides that in the absence of appropriated funds no obligation can be incurred except for the protection of life and property, the orderly suspension of operations, or as otherwise authorized by law. This means that absent an appropriation, many Federal employees are prohibited from working, even on a volunteer basis, “except for emergencies involving the safety of human life or the protection of property”. 31 U.S.C. §1342. Accordingly, each Federal agency must designate those employees whose work is necessary to sustain legal operations essential to the safety of human life and the protection of property.

Department Of Justice’s Contingency Plan.

The Department of Justice has issued guidance, which gives priority to continuing work on criminal cases. Consequently, no employees in the Tax Division of the Department Of Justice will be authorized to work on CIVIL MATTERS during a lapse in appropriations.

Updated Contingency Plan Of The IRS.

The following activities of IRS that will continue which are necessary for safety of human life or protection of government property that continue to be operational at IRS are:

  • Continuing to complete and test upcoming filing year programs
  • Processing electronic returns, up to the point of refund
  • Processing paper tax returns through “batching”
  • Processing remittances; and
  • Maintaining criminal law enforcement operations.

The IRS will also be opening its call sites and responding to taxpayer questions; however, all IRS audit and examination functions and nonautomated collections will continue to be put on hold during the shutdown.

When funds are appropriated to the IRS, furloughed employees will return to work (they are expected to return within four hours after the reactivation is announced if it occurs on a scheduled work day).

An Opportunity For Taxpayers Who Owe The IRS.

Do not think that if you owe the IRS your tax problem will disappear because the IRS is not fully operational. Instead you should be utilizing this valuable time to get yourself prepared so that when IRS re-opens for business, you are ready to make the best offer or proposal to take control of your outstanding tax debts.

As a prerequisite to any proposal to the IRS, you must be in current compliance. That means if you have any outstanding income tax returns, they must be completed and submitted to IRS. Also, if you are required to make estimated tax payments, you must be current in making those payments. Fortunately, as we are now in 2019, taxpayers who expect to owe for 2018 should have their 2018 income tax returns done now so that the 2018 liability can be rolled over into any proposal and the requirement to make estimated tax payments will now start for 2019.

The take away from this – use the Federal government’s downtime to your advantage to prepare for the future.

What Should You Do?

You know that at the Law Offices Of Jeffrey B. Kahn, P.C. we are always thinking of ways that our clients can save on taxes. If you are selected for an audit, stand up to the IRS by getting representation. Tax problems are usually a serious matter and must be handled appropriately so it’s important to that you’ve hired the best lawyer for your particular situation. The tax attorneys at the Law Offices Of Jeffrey B. Kahn, P.C. located in Orange County (Irvine), Metropolitan Los Angeles (Long Beach and Ontario) and elsewhere in California are highly skilled in handling tax matters and can effectively represent at all levels with the IRS and State Tax Agencies including criminal tax investigations and attempted prosecutions, undisclosed foreign bank accounts and other foreign assets, and unreported foreign income. Also if you are involved in cannabis, check out what our cannabis tax attorneys can do for you.

1099 filing deadline 199A IRS tax deduction

January 31 Deadline Looms for Forms W-2 and 1099-MISC

January 31 Deadline Looms for Forms W-2 and 1099-MISC

The possibility that the government shutdown will continue into next month resulting in many IRS employees not working to process Forms W-2 and Forms 1099-MISC has no impact on the January 31 deadline for filing these forms.

Filing Deadlines for Forms W-2 and Forms 1099-MISC

The 2018 Forms W-2 must be filed with the Social Security Administration (SSA) by January 31, 2019. Form 1099-MISC must be filed with the IRS by January 31st if non-employee compensation (NEC) is being reported on the form. If a Form 1099-MISC is not reporting NEC and is filed on paper, the filing deadline is February 28, 2019. If the Form 1099-MISC is not reporting NEC and is filed electronically, the deadline is March 31, 2019.

Regardless of the deadlines above, all of these forms must be given to taxpayers no later than January 31st. This filing deadline was made uniform under The Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes (PATH) Act. Prior law required that only W-2’s had to be provided to employees no later than January 31st with all other reporting forms (including the copies to IRS) due by the end of February. Failure to file these forms correctly and timely may result in penalties to the employer or payor.

Extensions of time to file Form W-2 may be requested. One 30-day extension to file Form W-2 may be requested by submitting a complete application on Form 8809, Application for Extension of Time to File Information Returns. Form 8809 must include a detailed explanation of why the additional time is needed and be signed under penalties of perjury. The IRS states that extensions are granted only in extraordinary circumstances or catastrophe.

Penalties for Failing to File Correct and Timely Forms 1099s

Information reporting penalties apply if a payer fails to timely file an information return, fails to include all information required to be shown on the return, or includes incorrect information on the return. The penalties apply to all variations of Form 1099. The amount of the penalty is based on when the correct information return is filed.

For returns required to be filed for the 2018 tax year, the penalty is:

  • $50 per information return for returns filed correctly within 30 days after the due date, with a maximum penalty of $545,500 a year ($191,000 for certain small businesses);
  •  $100 per information return for returns filed more than 30 days after the due date but by August 1, with a maximum penalty of $1,637,500 a year ($545,500 for certain small businesses); and
  • $270 per information return for returns filed after August 1st or not filed at all, with a maximum penalty of $3,275,500 a year for most businesses, but $1,091,500 for certain small businesses.

For purposes of the lower penalty, a business is a small business for any calendar year if its average annual gross receipts for the three most recent tax years (or for the period it was in existence, if shorter) ending before the calendar year do not exceed $5 million.

Persons who are required to file information returns electronically but who fail to do so (without an approved waiver) are treated as having failed to file the return unless the person shows reasonable cause for the failure. However, they can file up to 250 returns on paper; those returns will not be subject to a penalty for failure to file electronically. The penalty applies separately to original returns and corrected returns.

The penalty also applies if a person reports an incorrect taxpayer identification number (TIN) or fails to report a TIN, or fails to file paper forms that are machine readable.

The penalty for failure to include the correct information on a return does not apply to a de minimis number of information returns with such failures if the failures are corrected by August 1st of the calendar year in which the due date occurs. The number of returns to which this exception applies cannot be more than the greater of 10 returns or 0.5 percent of the total number of information returns required to be filed for the year.

If a failure to file a correct information return is due to an intentional disregard of one of the requirements (i.e., it is a knowing or willing failure), the penalty is the greater of $530 per return or the statutory percentage of the aggregate dollar amount of the items required to be reported (the statutory percentage depends on the type of information return at issue). In addition, in the case of intentional disregard of the requirements, the $5 million limitation does not apply.

Under IRS Notice 2017-9, a safe harbor from penalties has been established for failure to file correct information returns and failure to furnish correct payee statements for certain de minimis errors. Under the safe harbor, an error on an information return or payee statement is not required to be corrected, and no penalty is imposed, if the error relates to an incorrect dollar amount and the error differs from the correct amount by no more than $100 ($25 in the case of an error with respect to an amount of tax withheld).

Automated Substitute For Return Program

When a taxpayer does not file and the IRS has information statements indicating a filing requirement, the IRS uses the data to file a return on behalf of the taxpayer if there is a projected balance owed. In 2012, the IRS used information statements to file 803,000 returns for taxpayers, totaling $6.7 billion in additional taxes owed. And the sad thing about this is in just about every case, the amount actually owed when a tax return is filed by the taxpayer is much lower than what the IRS says a non-filer taxpayer owes. We even had cases where the IRS ended up owing our clients money.

The Stakes Are High!

A recent U.S. Government Accountability Office study showed that the IRS spends $267 million on underreporter matching programs, compared with the $4.2 billion it spends on audits. But automated information-matching programs return almost six times more revenue than audits. You can see why with fewer IRS agents and reduced budgets, the IRS will increasingly rely on technology-driven matching programs to bring in more tax dollars.

What Should You Do?

So if you receive one of these audit notices or the IRS is looking to assert penalties on late or incomplete 1099 filings, it is important that you don’t ignore it. Protect yourself from excessive fines and possible jail time. Let the tax attorneys of the Law Offices Of Jeffrey B. Kahn, P.C. located in Orange County (Irvine), San Diego County (Carlsbad) and elsewhere in California defend you from the IRS. If you are involved in cannabis, check out what our cannabis tax attorneys can do for you.

I need to report foreign income? FBAR

Federal Court Of Appeals For The Third Circuit Clarifies Standard for Proving a “Willful” FBAR Violation

Federal Court Of Appeals For The Third Circuit Clarifies Standard for Proving a “Willful” FBAR Violation

Not much has come out of the Courts defining that line between nonwillful and willful when it comes to not filing Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts Reports (“FBAR”) but now we have a recent U.S. Federal Circuit Of Appeals case out of the Third District which has vast repercussions on anyone who has undisclosed foreign bank accounts regardless of whether they came forward in a Voluntary Disclosure Program or the Streamlined Procedures.

Bedrosian v. U.S.

In December 2018 the Federal Circuit Court Of Appeals for the Third District (the “Appeals Court”), Bedrosian v. U.S., 2018 PTC 427 (3rd Cir. 2018), on an appeal by the IRS issued its opinion determining that the taxpayer’s failure to timely file an FBAR was nonwillful. The tax law provides that U.S. citizens with accounts outside the U.S. must disclose those accounts on an FBAR if the aggregate amount is at least $10,000. 31 U.S.C. 5314. The reason the term “willful” is important is that if the failure is not willful, the penalty is set at $10,000 per violation but if the failure to disclose is considered “willful”, the penalty goes up to the greater of $100,000 or 50% of the highest account value for the year.

In the case of Arthur Bedrosian the IRS in January 2015 assessed a willful FBAR penalty for tax year 2007 of approximately $975,000, which was 50% of the undisclosed account. Mr. Bedrosian paid 1% of the penalty and then sued in Federal District Court to recover the payment as an unlawful exaction. The government counterclaimed for the full penalty amount plus interest and a late payment penalty.

Facts

Mr. Bedrosian worked in the pharmaceutical industry eventually rising to the level of CEO at Lannett Company, Inc., a company that manufactures generic medications. He had to travel abroad for business and so for convenience by 1973 had established a bank account with Swiss Credit Corporation in Switzerland (now UBS) by which he could access funds instead of paying for expenses with traveler’s checks. Eventually he started using it as a savings account and in 2005 he was approached by the bank representatives who offered him 750,000 Swiss Francs if he converts his account into an investment account. Mr. Bedrosian agreed and as a result of this transaction, another account was created under his name.

It was not until tax year 2007 that Mr. Bedrosian included, for the first time, an affirmative answer to the question on his Form 1040 Schedule B asking whether “[a]t any time during 2007, [he had] an interest in or signature or other authority over a financial account in a foreign country.” He listed Switzerland as the country. He also filed an FBAR for the first time in which he reported the existence of one of the two UBS accounts.

The IRS notified Mr. Bedrosian in April 2011 that it would be auditing his returns and he was cooperative and forthcoming in his dealings with the IRS. In the results of the audit, the IRS assessed a willful FBAR penalty for tax year 2007 of just under $1 million.

When the case was first heard by the Federal District Court, the only disputed issue was whether Mr. Bedrosian’s failure to disclose his $2 million UBS account was willful. In that case as reported in Bedrosian v. U.S., 2017 PTC 431 (E.D. Pa. 2017), the district court concluded that the IRS had failed to establish Mr. Bedrosian’s willfulness. The government appealed to the Third Circuit, arguing that the district court used an incorrect legal standard for willfulness, placed too much weight on Mr. Bedrosian’s subjective motivations, and erred in finding that Mr. Bedrosian did not know he owned a second foreign bank account.

Court’s Analysis

The Court Of Appeals stated that to prove a “willful” violation with respect to the filing of an FBAR, the IRS must satisfy the civil willfulness standard, which includes both knowing and reckless conduct.

In its analysis of “willfulness,” the court considered the taxpayers’ behaviors in U.S. v. Williams, 489 Fed. Appx. 655 (4th Cir. 2012), and U.S. v. McBride, 908 F. Supp. 2d 1186 (D. Utah 2012). The court noted that unlike those taxpayers, who continued to submit inaccurate FBARs even after being targets of government investigation, or who repeatedly lied and refused to produce requested documents, Mr. Bedrosian was cooperative with the IRS during the audit process.

Upon the IRS’ urging to consider “willfulness” outside of the FBAR context, the court also reviewed Greenberg vs. U.S., 46 F.3d 239 (3d Cir. 1994). There the court had considered whether a party had willfully failed to pay certain employer withholding taxes. It was determined that willfulness depended on the individual’s knowledge that his company had not paid the taxes at the time he paid company funds to the employees and other suppliers.

Although the court here agreed that Mr. Bedrosian should have been more careful about reviewing the 2007 FBAR and in being aware of the fact that he had not one but two accounts at UBS, the court determined that it was not apparent that he submitted it knowing that it omitted the second UBS account.

Significantly, the court summarized that the only evidence supporting a finding that Mr. Bedrosian’s violation was “willful” was: (1) the inaccurate form itself, lacking reference to the second account, (2) the fact that he may have learned of the second account’s existence at one of his meetings with a UBS representative, (3) his sophistication as a businessman, and (4) his accountant’s statement to him in the mid-1990s that he was breaking the law. The court concluded that “none of these indicate ‘conduct meant to conceal or mislead’ or a ‘conscious effort to avoid learning about reporting requirements,’ even if they may show negligence”.

Accordingly the Third Circuit then remanded the case for the district court affirming that Mr. Bedrosian did not act willfully in failing to disclose the second UBS account in his 2007 FBAR filing.

What Should You Do?

Taxpayers who have entered into the Streamlined Program whose case is weak on showing nonwilfullness have a huge risk of being picked by IRS and losing the favorable status offered by the Streamlined Procedures where the IRS feels that the non-willful standard is not met.  Such taxpayers will not then be able to enter into a voluntary disclosure program and can face the same battle as Mr. Bedrosian.  Likewise, anyone who has not come forward in voluntary disclosure and the issue of nonwilfullness is questionable would still have the opportunity to come forward under a voluntary disclosure program.  Keep in mind that any submission must be complete or else like Mr. Bedrosian, the IRS will reject the settlement and look to assess the full penalties provided by law. Let the tax attorneys at the Law Offices Of Jeffrey B. Kahn, P.C. located in Orange County (Irvine), San Francisco Bay Area (including San Jose and Walnut Creek) and offices elsewhere in California get you set up with a plan that may include being qualified into a voluntary disclosure program to avoid criminal prosecution, seek abatement of penalties, and minimize your tax liability. Also, if you are involved in cannabis, check out how our cannabis tax attorneys can help you.

bitcoin-cryptocurrency law attorney

What You Need To Know If Buying And Selling Crypto Currencies

What You Need To Know If Buying And Selling Crypto Currencies

It is getting easier for people to buy or acquire crypto currency because more and more exchanges are being created and different methods of purchase (besides cash and money orders) are now available using credit and debit cards, Paypal, and barter arrangements.

Storing Your Crypto Currency – The Non-Custodial Wallet

After choosing a crypto currency to acquire, you should get a noncustodial wallet so you can store the crypto currency in a safe place. Keep in mind that your wallet must be compatible with the crypto currency that is going into it – for example, an ETH wallet will not work with BCH and vice versa. If you do not have a wallet, your crypto currency will be left on an exchange which leaves your crypto currency vulnerable to the risk of theft.

Methods Of Acquiring Crypto Currency

After obtaining a wallet which can be accessed from your mobile phone or desktop, you then can proceed to purchase crypto currency. The three primary ways are:

  • An exchange,
  • A crypto currency ATM, or
  • A peer-to-peer service.

Exchange

Exchanges are trading platforms that let you buy and sell cryptocurrencies for other digital assets or fiat. An exchange is a quick way to obtain crypto currency but because you will need an on-line means of payment, you will not be able to use cash. Trading platforms allow you to pay using a credit card, Paypal or bank wire. Keep in mind that you will first need to verify your identity and validate a payment system with the exchange before you can start purchasing.

Crypto Currency Automated Teller Machine (ATM)

There are more than 4,000 digital asset dispensing devices all over the world. In order to locate a machine in your local area, check out Coinatmradar.com. Expect to pay a transaction fee of 6 to10 percent per transaction.

Peer-to-Peer Service

The last method for acquiring cryptocurrency is in a peer-to-peer fashion. In other words, you can buy coins from a friend who already has digital currencies or you can opt to use a service that will act as an intermediary for the transaction. Services available include: Openbazaar.org, Localbitcoincash.org, Bitquick, Paxful, or Localbitcoins.com. These services allow anyone to buy from a person selling coins either in person or online by using an escrow system to keep the trades fair.

Taxation of Crypto Currency.

While buying a digital currency is straightforward, the tax rules that apply can get pretty tricky. Notice 2014-21 provides these tax rules:

  • Trading cryptocurrencies produces capital gains or losses, with the latter being able to offset gains and reduce tax.
  • Exchanging one token for another — for example, using Ethereum to purchase an altcoin — creates a taxable event. The token is treated as being sold, thus generating capital gains or losses.
  • Receiving payments in crypto in exchange for products or services or as salary is treated as ordinary income at the fair market value of the coin at the time of receipt.
  • Spending crypto is a tax event and may generate capital gains or losses, which can be short-term or long-term. For example, say you bought one coin for $500. If that coin was then worth $700 and you bought a $700 gift card, there is a $200 taxable gain. Depending on the holding period, it could be a short- or long-term capital gain subject to different rates.
  • Converting a cryptocurrency to U.S. dollars or another currency at a gain is a taxable event, as it is treated as being sold, thus generating capital gains.
  • Air drops are considered ordinary income on the day of the air drop. That value will become the basis of the coin. When it’s sold, exchanged, etc., there will be a capital gain.
  • Mining coins is considered ordinary income equal to the fair market value of the coin the day it was successfully mined.
  • Initial coin offerings do not fall under the IRS’s tax-free treatment for raising capital. Thus, they produce ordinary income to individuals and businesses alike.

Penalties For Filing A False Income Tax Return Or Under-reporting Income.

Failure to report all the money you make is a main reason folks end up facing an IRS auditor. Carelessness on your tax return might get you whacked with a 20% penalty. But that’s nothing compared to the 75% civil penalty for willful tax fraud and possibly facing criminal charges of tax evasion that if convicted could land you in jail.

Criminal Fraud – The law defines that any person who willfully attempts in any manner to evade or defeat any tax under the Internal Revenue Code or the payment thereof is, in addition to other penalties provided by law, guilty of a felony and, upon conviction thereof, can be fined not more than $100,000 ($500,000 in the case of a corporation), or imprisoned not more than five years, or both, together with the costs of prosecution (Code Sec. 7201).

The term “willfully” has been interpreted to require a specific intent to violate the law (U.S. v. Pomponio, 429 U.S. 10 (1976)). The term “willfulness” is defined as the voluntary, intentional violation of a known legal duty (Cheek v. U.S., 498 U.S. 192 (1991)).

And even if the IRS is not looking to put you in jail, they will be looking to hit you with a big tax bill with hefty penalties.

Civil Fraud – Normally the IRS will impose a negligence penalty of 20% of the underpayment of tax (Code Sec. 6662(b)(1) and 6662(b)(2)) but violations of the Internal Revenue Code with the intent to evade income taxes may result in a civil fraud penalty. In lieu of the 20% negligence penalty, the civil fraud penalty is 75% of the underpayment of tax (Code Sec. 6663). The imposition of the Civil Fraud Penalty essentially doubles your liability to the IRS!

Voluntary Disclosure – The Way To Avoid Criminal Fines & Punishment

The IRS has not yet announced a specific tax amnesty for people who failed to report their gains and income from Bitcoin and other virtual currencies but under the existing Voluntary Disclosure Program, non-compliant taxpayers can come forward to avoid criminal prosecution and negotiate lower penalties.

What Should You Do?

With only several hundred people reporting their crypto gains each year since bitcoin’s launch, the IRS suspects that many crypto users have been evading taxes by not reporting crypto transactions on their tax returns.  Don’t delay because once the IRS has targeted you for investigation – even if it is a routine random audit – it will be too late voluntarily come forward. Let the tax attorneys at the Law Offices Of Jeffrey B. Kahn, P.C. located in Orange County (Irvine), San Francisco Bay Area (including San Jose and Walnut Creek) and offices elsewhere in California get you set up with a plan that may include being qualified into a voluntary disclosure program to avoid criminal prosecution, seek abatement of penalties, and minimize your tax liability. Also, if you are involved in cannabis, check out how our cannabis tax attorneys can help you.

Cannabis Bill

Congressman Introduces Cannabis Legalization Bill H.R. 420 – If You Can’t Beat Them, Then Join Them!

Under Federal law (Controlled Substances Act 21 U.S.C. 801) marijuana is designated as a Schedule I controlled substance due to the historical belief that it has a high potential for abuse, no currently accepted medical use in treatment, and lack of accepted safety for use under medical supervision.

The federal penalties for possession of any amount of marijuana are as follows:

  • First Offense – Misdemeanor involving up to one year of incarceration and $1,000 in fines
  • Second Offense – Misdemeanor punishable by 15 days to 2 years behind bars and $2,500 in fines
  • Third and subsequent offenses – Misdemeanor or felony punishable by 90 days to 3 years of incarceration and fines of up to $5,000.

The penalties for the sale of marijuana depend on the amount of marijuana you have been accused of selling or attempting to sell:

  • Less than 50 kilograms – Felony punishable by up to 5 years in prison and/or up to $250,000 in fines
  • 50 to 99 kilograms – Felony punishable by up to 20 years in prison and/or fines of up to $1,000,000
  • 100 to 999 kilograms – Felony involving 5 to 40 years incarceration and/or fines of up to $2,000,000
  • 1000 kg and up – Felony carrying a sentence of 10 years to life in prison and/or up to  $4,000,000 in fines

As for the cultivation of marijuana, the federal authorities punish it on the basis of the number of plants you were caught growing:

  • Less than 50 plants – Felony punishable by up to 5 years in prison and/or up to $250,000 in fines
  • 50 to 99 plants – Felony punishable by up to 20 years in prison and/or up to $1,000,000 in fines
  • 100 to 999 plants – Felony carrying a 5 to 40-year prison sentence and/or fines of up to $5,000,000
  • 1,000 plants or more – Felony involving 10 years to life in prison and/or fines of up to $10,000,000

With aggravating factors such as a trafficking activity that results in an injury or death, a sale within 1,000 feet of a school, or a case involving five grams sold to a minor, the above penalties may increase dramatically.

How things have changed –

  • Medical marijuana is now legal in 31 states plus the District Of Columbia and recreational marijuana is legal in 8 states plus the District Of Columbia. Eight of those states (Alaska, California, Colorado, Maine, Massachusetts, Nevada, Oregon and Washington) and the District of Columbia have also legalized marijuana for recreational use.
  • According to a 2017 Yahoo News/Marist Poll survey, 83% of Americans support legalization of marijuana.
  • Republican Congressman John Boehner has joined the advisory board of Acreage Holdings, a company that cultivates, processes and dispenses cannabis in 11 U.S. states.
  • Democratic Senator Dianne Feinstein now says the federal government should not interfere in California’s legal marijuana market. Feinstein’s office said her views changed after meetings with constituents, particularly those with young children who have benefited from medical marijuana use.
  • President Trump discusses with Republican Senator Cory Gardner how he would consider backing Congressional legislation that would protect states with legalized marijuana from the Department of Justice.

House Bill Introduced January 9, 2019

House Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D-Ore.) introduced a bill to remove marijuana from the controlled substances list and treat the drug like alcohol. The bill, known as the “Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol Act”, is numbered as “H.R. 420” in reference to 4/20 (April 20), which is consider as a national holiday in cannabis culture. 

The bill would “de-schedule” cannabis, thus permitting state governments to regulate these activities as the states see fit. Further, cannabis would be removed from the enforcement power from the Federal Drug Enforcement Administration in matters concerning cannabis possession, production and sales, to a newly renamed Federal Department of “Alcohol, Marijuana, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives” to ensure compliance with state laws and prevent illegal trafficking.

This is not the first attempt by Rep. Blumenauer to help the cannabis industry. He’s the founder and co-chair of the Congressional Cannabis Caucus, and he’s been a co-sponsor to the rider attached to every federal spending bill in recent years that disallows the Justice Department from using any federal funding to prosecute medical cannabis businesses operating in legal states.

The full text of the Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol Act can be viewed here

Higher Taxes Still Remain

While the developments listed above are favorable for cannabis business, it still remains to be seen when favorable changes will be made to the Internal Revenue Code which treats businesses in the marijuana industry differently resulting in such business paying at least 3-times as much in taxes as ordinary businesses.

Generally, businesses can deduct ordinary and necessary business expenses under I.R.C. §162. This includes wages, rent, supplies, etc. However, in 1982 Congress added I.R.C. §280E. Under §280E, taxpayers cannot deduct any amount for a trade or business where the trade or business consists of trafficking in controlled substances…which is prohibited by Federal law. Marijuana, including medical marijuana, is a controlled substance. What this means is that dispensaries and other businesses trafficking in marijuana have to report all of their income and cannot deduct rent, wages, and other expenses, making their marginal tax rate substantially higher than most other businesses.

Reporting Of Cash Payments Still Remain

The Bank Secrecy Act of 1970 (“BSA”) requires financial institutions in the United States to assist U.S. government agencies to detect and prevent money laundering. Specifically, the act requires financial institutions to keep records of cash purchases of negotiable instruments, and file reports of cash purchases of these negotiable instruments of more than $10,000 (daily aggregate amount), and to report suspicious activity that might signify money laundering, tax evasion, or other criminal activities. The BSA requires any business receiving one or more related cash payments totaling more than $10,000 to file IRS Form 8300, Report of Cash Payments Over $10,000 Received in a Trade or Business.

The minimum penalty for failing to file EACH Form 8300 is $25,000 if the failure is due to an intentional or willful disregard of the cash reporting requirements. Penalties may also be imposed for causing, or attempting to cause, a trade or business to fail to file a required report; for causing, or attempting to cause, a trade or business to file a required report containing a material omission or misstatement of fact; or for structuring, or attempting to structure, transactions to avoid the reporting requirements. These violations may also be subject to criminal prosecution which, upon conviction, may result in imprisonment of up to 5 years or fines of up to $250,000 for individuals and $500,000 for corporations or both.

Marijuana-related businesses operate in an environment of cash transactions as many banks remain reluctant to do business with many in the marijuana industry. Like any cash-based business the IRS scrutinizes the amount of gross receipts to report and it is harder to prove to the IRS expenses paid in cash. So it is of most importance that the proper facilities and procedures be set up to maintain an adequate system of books and records.

How Do You Know Which Cannabis Tax Attorney Is Best For You?

Given that cannabis is still illegal under existing Federal law you need to protect yourself and your marijuana business from all challenges created by the U.S. government.  While cannabis is legal in California, that is not enough to protect you.  It’s coming down that the biggest risk is TAXES.  Be proactive and engage an experienced Cannabis Tax Attorney in your area. Let the tax attorneys of the Law Offices Of Jeffrey B. Kahn, P.C. located in Orange County, Inland Empire (Ontario and Palm Springs) and other California locations protect you and maximize your net profits.

federal cannabis legalization bill

New Congressional Cannabis Caucus Co-Chairs Announced

The departure of Representatives Jared Polis and Dana Rohrabacher from Congress left vacant two seats on the bipartisan Congressional Cannabis Caucus (the “Caucus”) so on January 9, 2019, the new leadership team of the Congressional Cannabis Caucus was announced, with Representatives Barbara Lee (D-CA) and David Joyce (R-OH) joining founding members Earl Blumenauer (D-OR) and Don Young (R-AK).

The Caucus was first established in 2017to help shape the marijuana reform agenda in the House and build bipartisan support for legislation that would address issues facing the marijuana industry such as banking, taxation, de-criminalization, medical research and veterans’ healthcare.

The comments of three of the members of the Caucus on the work they hope the Caucus will accomplish, from addressing the racial injustices of the drug war to implementing commonsense policies to support medical research into marijuana were made in various press releases.

Representative Earl Blumenauer’s Press Release Statement

Representative Barbara Lee’s Press Release Statement

Representative Don Young’s Press Release Statement

Rep. Blumenauer stated:

“The Cannabis Caucus was the first of its kind to create a forum for elected officials to collaborate on ways to address our outdated federal marijuana laws.  Congress is clearly out of step with the American people on cannabis when national support for federal marijuana legalization is at an all-time high and we saw several states move toward with legalization last November.”

The addition of Rep. Lee adds diversity to the Caucus’s leadership as she will become the first woman and first African-American to serve as co-chair. Rep. Lee is no stranger to cannabis activism as she introduced the Marijuana Justice Act in the last Congress which received the highest number of co-sponsorships of any legislation that would remove marijuana from the Federal Controlled Substances Act in history.

Rep. Lee stated:

“For far too long, communities of color and women have been left out of the conversation on cannabis. I am committed to ensuring that marijuana reform goes hand-in-hand with criminal justice reform so we can repair some of the harm of the failed War on Drugs. We must also work to build an industry that is equitable and inclusive of the communities most impacted by cannabis prohibition,” said Rep. Lee.

Rep. Young stated:

“Since the initial launch of the Congressional Cannabis Caucus we’ve seen an exponential growth in interest, legislation, and membership many would not have expected.The idea of States’ Rights has been a central tenet of this movement and one that I believe will ultimately carry the day. I encourage all Members to join us in this debate and explore the varying issues.”

It is noteworthy that Rep. Joyce becomes the first leader in the Caucus to come from a state (Ohio) that has yet to pass an adult-use regulatory program. He nevertheless has been a long-time supporter of reform efforts introducing The States Act (legislation that would ease the tension between federal prohibition and state-legal cannabis programs), as well as was a cosponsor of the Ending Federal Marijuana Prohibition Act (legislation which would remove cannabis from the Controlled Substance Act entirely).

The Federal Controlled Substances Act

The Federal Controlled Substances Act (“CSA”) 21 U.S.C. § 812 classifies marijuana as a Schedule 1 substance with a high potential for abuse, no currently accepted medical use in treatment, and lack of accepted safety for use under medical supervision. Although you can still face federal criminal charges for using, growing, or selling weed in a manner that is completely lawful under California law and other states that have legalized cannabis, the federal authorities in the past have pulled back from targeting individuals and businesses engaged in medical marijuana activities. This pull back though has no impact on the IRS which will likely start in 2019 to more aggressively target cannabis businesses with audits.

Risk Of Getting A Big Tax Bill From IRS That You Cannot Pay

Generally, businesses can deduct ordinary and necessary business expenses under I.R.C. §162. This includes wages, rent, supplies, etc. However, in 1982 Congress added I.R.C. §280E. Under §280E, taxpayers cannot deduct any amount for a trade or business where the trade or business consists of trafficking in controlled substances…which is prohibited by Federal law. Marijuana, including medical marijuana, is a controlled substance. What this means is that dispensaries and other businesses trafficking in marijuana have to report all of their income and cannot deduct rent, wages, and other expenses, making their marginal tax rate substantially higher than most other businesses. A cannabis business that has not properly reported its income and expenses and not engaged in the planning to minimize income taxes can face a large liability proposed by IRS reflected on a Notice Of Deficiency or tax bill.

This risk should be risk posing the greatest challenge to any cannabis business as the Federal taxation of cannabis businesses is consistent in all states and not dependent on whether local Federal prosecutors are aggressive in enforcing the illegality of cannabis or the banks unwilling to do business with the cannabis industry. This unexpected liability can put you out of business so it is important to secure qualified tax counsel to be proactive with tax planning to minimize taxes and to defend you in any tax examinations, appeals or litigation with the IRS.

What Should You Do?

While more States are legalizing cannabis, risks to the cannabis industry still exist.  Considering this risks of cannabis you need to protect yourself and your investment. Level the playing field and gain the upper hand by engaging the cannabis tax attorneys at the Law Offices Of Jeffrey B. Kahn, P.C. located in Orange County (Irvine), the Inland Empire (including Ontario and Palm Springs) and other California locations. We can come up with solutions and strategies to these risks and protect you and your business to maximize your net profits.

Warning For U.S. Taxpayers With Interests In Foreign Corporations – You May Be Writing A Check To IRS.

Warning For U.S. Taxpayers With Interests In Foreign Corporations – You May Be Writing A Check To IRS.

If you own an interest in a foreign corporation, you may be required to file Form 5471, Information Return of U.S. Persons With Respect to Certain Foreign Corporations. It is one of the most complex reporting obligations in the U.S. offshore information tax reporting regime and for U.S. taxpayers not complying could lead to rather large penalties. A taxpayer who fails to file a “substantially complete” Form 5471, absent reasonable cause, is subject to severe monetary and other penalties, beginning at $10,000 per year per missed form.

It does not matter where you live, if you are a U.S. person with an ownership interest of at least 10% in a foreign corporation, the IRS wants to know about it and you must file Form 5471. Even if you live abroad and qualify for the Foreign Earned Income Exclusion, you must still file Form 5471.

Additionally, the statute of limitations remains open for failure to file a Form 5471 on the taxpayer’s entire income tax return until the IRS receives a substantially complete filing. This subjects your income tax return to a longer period of audit scrutiny.

The IRS utilizes Form 5471 to have a complete transparency of what U.S. persons own interests in foreign corporations. It is merely an informational return and has nothing to do with the computation of any tax. This is similar in purpose to FBAR’s which is a separate informational return filing that taxpayers with foreign bank accounts are required to file on an annual basis.

Who Has to File?

If you are a U.S. person who is an officer, director, or shareholder in a foreign corporation (that is a legal entity formed under the laws of a country other than the United States) you need to comply with the requirement to file Form 5471.

There are four active filing categories with different filing requirements for those who meet each separate category description. If you meet more than one category description, you can file once but must include all of the information required for both categories.

For the majority of the categories, a U.S. person is defined as any of the following: a U.S. citizen or resident, a domestic U.S. partnership, a domestic U.S. corporation, or a domestic estate or trust.

The categories are as follows:

Category 2: This category applies in the year when a U.S. person acquires 10% or more of the stock in a foreign corporation as an officer or director.

Category 3: This category applies to any U.S. person who adds to their stock in a company, thereby surpassing the 10% minimum ownership, or any U.S. person who sells their stock in a company so that they own less than 10%.

Category 4: This category applies to any U.S. person who owns more than 50% of the stock of a foreign corporation.

Category 5: This category applies to any U.S. person who owns at least 10% of a “controlled foreign corporation” or CFC.

No matter which category you may fall in, the penalties for not filing Form 5471 would be the same.

Penalties

The penalty for not filing Form 5471 (or doing so incorrectly) is $10,000 for each tax year. An additional $10,000 will be charged if the information is not provided within 90 days after the IRS has mailed a notice of failure to the U.S. person. After that, an additional $10,000 penalty will be applied each 30-day period until the information is filed. The maximum penalty is limited to $50,000 for each failure but considering that multiple years of non-compliance may be involved, you can see how this amount can grow even bigger.

Keep in mind that the foreign corporation does not have to have any profits for the penalties to apply. This is a penalty for a failure to file an informational report, not a tax that results from the information provided on the form.

It is possible to get these penalties abated due to “reasonable cause” which is why the hiring of qualified tax counsel is essential to pursue such a result and to make sure that your Form 5471 filings are acceptable to the IRS.

When to File

Form 5471 should be attached to your income tax return if filing as an individual, or with your corporate tax return if filing as a corporation.

The corresponding due dates of each type of filing apply as well. For example, Form 5471 is due by March 15th if filed by a corporation. If filed by an individual, it would be due April 15th, or June 15th if you are an expat. Now if any income tax return is put on extension, the due date for the Form 5471 also follows the extended filing deadline of the underlying income tax return.

What Should You Do?

You know that at the Law Offices Of Jeffrey B. Kahn, P.C. we are always thinking of ways that our clients can save on taxes. If you are selected for an audit, stand up to the IRS by getting representation. Tax problems are usually a serious matter and must be handled appropriately so it’s important to that you’ve hired the best lawyer for your particular situation. The tax attorneys at the Law Offices Of Jeffrey B. Kahn, P.C. located in Orange County (Irvine), Metropolitan Los Angeles (Long Beach) and elsewhere in California are highly skilled in handling tax matters and can effectively represent at all levels with the IRS and State Tax Agencies including criminal tax investigations and attempted prosecutions, undisclosed foreign bank accounts and other foreign assets, and unreported foreign income. Also if you are involved in cannabis, check out what our cannabis tax attorneys can do for you.

How The Federal Government’s Shutdown Is Creating Opportunity For Taxpayers With IRS Debt.

How The Federal Government’s Shutdown Is Creating Opportunity For Taxpayers With IRS Debt.

At midnight on December 21, 2018, funding for Federal government agencies lapsed triggering a partial shutdown of the federal government. The date when funding will be restored by Congress has not been established but under plans established by each Federal agency, as the lapse in funding continues more Federal government functions will be shutdown.

The Anti-Deficiency Act.

Overriding each Federal agency’s plan is the Anti-Deficiency Act, 31 U.S.C. §1341, which provides that in the absence of appropriated funds no obligation can be incurred except for the protection of life and property, the orderly suspension of operations, or as otherwise authorized by law. This means that absent an appropriation, many Federal employees are prohibited from working, even on a volunteer basis, “except for emergencies involving the safety of human life or the protection of property”. 31 U.S.C. §1342. Accordingly, each Federal agency must designate those employees whose work is necessary to sustain legal operations essential to the safety of human life and the protection of property.

Department Of Justice’s Contingency Plan.

The Department of Justice has issued guidance, which gives priority to continuing work on criminal cases. Consequently, no employees in the Tax Division of the Department Of Justice will be authorized to work on CIVIL MATTERS during a lapse in appropriations.

Internal Revenue Service’s Contingency Plan.

The IRS being an agency under the Department Of Treasury in late November issued a fiscal year 2019 “Lapsed Appropriations Contingency Plan that governs what will happen at the IRS during a government shutdown — but only through December 31. With the government shutdown now continuing into 2019, a new plan will have to be formulated.

The initial plan covered only a five-day shutdown. Now that the shutdown is lasting longer than five business days and as of the writing of this blog no quick resolution appears in sight, the IRS will have to reassess ongoing activities and identify necessary adjustments of excepted positions and personnel.

The initial plan anticipated that preparation for the 2019 filing season will not be affected by the shutdown.

The initial plan also identified 9,946 IRS employees as “excepted/exempt” employees who would not be furloughed. The rest of the IRS’s 79,868 employees (as of November 10, 2018) would be furloughed, meaning they will be put on leave of absence without pay, under 5 C.F.R. Section 752.402.

The initial plan identified the following activities of IRS that will continue which are necessary for safety of human life or protection of government property:

  • Continuing to complete and test upcoming filing year programs
  • Processing electronic returns, up to the point of refund
  • Processing paper tax returns through “batching”
  • Processing remittances; and
  • Maintaining criminal law enforcement operations.

When funds are appropriated to the IRS, furloughed employees will return to work (they are expected to return within four hours after the reactivation is announced if it occurs on a scheduled work day).

An Opportunity For Taxpayers Who Owe The IRS.

Do not think that if you owe the IRS your tax problem will disappear because the IRS is not fully operational. Instead you should be utilizing this valuable time to get yourself prepared so that when IRS re-opens for business, you are ready to make the best offer or proposal to take control of your outstanding tax debts.

As a prerequisite to any proposal to the IRS, you must be in current compliance. That means if you have any outstanding income tax returns, they must be completed and submitted to IRS. Also, if you are required to make estimated tax payments, you must be current in making those payments. Fortunately, as we are now in 2019, taxpayers who expect to owe for 2018 should have their 2018 income tax returns done now so that the 2018 liability can be rolled over into any proposal and the requirement to make estimated tax payments will now start for 2019.

The take away from this – use the Federal government’s downtime to your advantage to prepare for the future.

What Should You Do?

You know that at the Law Offices Of Jeffrey B. Kahn, P.C. we are always thinking of ways that our clients can save on taxes. If you are selected for an audit, stand up to the IRS by getting representation. Tax problems are usually a serious matter and must be handled appropriately so it’s important to that you’ve hired the best lawyer for your particular situation. The tax attorneys at the Law Offices Of Jeffrey B. Kahn, P.C. located in Orange County (Irvine), the San Francisco Bay Area (including San Jose and Walnut Creek) and elsewhere in California are highly skilled in handling tax matters and can effectively represent at all levels with the IRS and State Tax Agencies including criminal tax investigations and attempted prosecutions, undisclosed foreign bank accounts and other foreign assets, and unreported foreign income. Also if you are involved in cannabis, check out what our cannabis tax attorneys can do for you.

overpay tax

Attention Crypto Currency Investors: Don’t Pay More In Taxes Than What You Have To!

Attention Crypto Currency Investors: Don’t Pay More In Taxes Than What You Have To!

During the last two months of 2018 Bitcoin was in its last bull run of the year that would result in a record high of $19,511 just before Christmas but at the close of 2018 was worth $3,743. If you bought Bitcoin and other crypto currencies when their prices were high, Uncle Sam has a present for you that could lower your taxes by allowing you to claim your losses.

This is due to Notice 2014-21 issued by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) which treats cryptocurrencies as an investment property, rather than a currency. Thus, whenever you trade cryptocurrency, the transaction is either a capital gain (where you make money) or a capital loss (where you lose money); and any losses this year could ultimately result in a smaller tax bill. Where your capital losses exceed your capital gains, you are still allowed to deduct up to $3,000 in capital losses. Losses beyond that amount get carried over to the next year to offset capital gains before applying another $3,000 excess loss application to your other income.

For example, assume a taxpayer bought $5,000 worth of BTC in 2018. After turning that into $10,000 through trading, he later lost cash due to a dip in the markets and took a big hit, losing $9,000. So he cashed out, walking away with just $1,000. Under this scenario he lost $4,000 in 2018 of which $3,000 he can still deduct in 2018 and the other $1,000 of loss gets carried forward to 2019.

Taxation of Crypto Currency.

Notice 2014-21 provides these tax rules:

  • Trading cryptocurrencies produces capital gains or losses, with the latter being able to offset gains and reduce tax.
  • Exchanging one token for another — for example, using Ethereum to purchase an altcoin — creates a taxable event. The token is treated as being sold, thus generating capital gains or losses.
  • Receiving payments in crypto in exchange for products or services or as salary is treated as ordinary income at the fair market value of the coin at the time of receipt.
  • Spending crypto is a tax event and may generate capital gains or losses, which can be short-term or long-term. For example, say you bought one coin for $500. If that coin was then worth $700 and you bought a $700 gift card, there is a $200 taxable gain. Depending on the holding period, it could be a short- or long-term capital gain subject to different rates.
  • Converting a cryptocurrency to U.S. dollars or another currency at a gain is a taxable event, as it is treated as being sold, thus generating capital gains.
  • Air drops are considered ordinary income on the day of the air drop. That value will become the basis of the coin. When it’s sold, exchanged, etc., there will be a capital gain.
  • Mining coins is considered ordinary income equal to the fair market value of the coin the day it was successfully mined.
  • Initial coin offerings do not fall under the IRS’s tax-free treatment for raising capital. Thus, they produce ordinary income to individuals and businesses alike.

Penalties For Filing A False Income Tax Return Or Under-reporting Income.

Failure to report all the money you make is a main reason folks end up facing an IRS auditor. Carelessness on your tax return might get you whacked with a 20% penalty. But that’s nothing compared to the 75% civil penalty for willful tax fraud and possibly facing criminal charges of tax evasion that if convicted could land you in jail.

Criminal Fraud – The law defines that any person who willfully attempts in any manner to evade or defeat any tax under the Internal Revenue Code or the payment thereof is, in addition to other penalties provided by law, guilty of a felony and, upon conviction thereof, can be fined not more than $100,000 ($500,000 in the case of a corporation), or imprisoned not more than five years, or both, together with the costs of prosecution (Code Sec. 7201).

The term “willfully” has been interpreted to require a specific intent to violate the law (U.S. v. Pomponio, 429 U.S. 10 (1976)). The term “willfulness” is defined as the voluntary, intentional violation of a known legal duty (Cheek v. U.S., 498 U.S. 192 (1991)).

And even if the IRS is not looking to put you in jail, they will be looking to hit you with a big tax bill with hefty penalties.

Civil Fraud – Normally the IRS will impose a negligence penalty of 20% of the underpayment of tax (Code Sec. 6662(b)(1) and 6662(b)(2)) but violations of the Internal Revenue Code with the intent to evade income taxes may result in a civil fraud penalty. In lieu of the 20% negligence penalty, the civil fraud penalty is 75% of the underpayment of tax (Code Sec. 6663). The imposition of the Civil Fraud Penalty essentially doubles your liability to the IRS!

Voluntary Disclosure – The Way To Avoid Criminal Fines & Punishment

The IRS has not yet announced a specific tax amnesty for people who failed to report their gains and income from Bitcoin and other virtual currencies but under the existing Voluntary Disclosure Program, non-compliant taxpayers can come forward to avoid criminal prosecution and negotiate lower penalties.

What Should You Do?

With only several hundred people reporting their crypto gains each year since bitcoin’s launch, the IRS suspects that many crypto users have been evading taxes by not reporting crypto transactions on their tax returns.  Don’t delay because once the IRS has targeted you for investigation – even if it is a routine random audit – it will be too late voluntarily come forward. Let the tax attorneys at the Law Offices Of Jeffrey B. Kahn, P.C. located in Orange County (Irvine), San Francisco Bay Area (including San Jose and Walnut Creek) and offices elsewhere in California get you set up with a plan that may include being qualified into a voluntary disclosure program to avoid criminal prosecution, seek abatement of penalties, and minimize your tax liability. Also, if you are involved in cannabis, check out how our cannabis tax attorneys can help you.

2019 tax return filing deadline

Getting Ready For The 2019 Tax Filing Season

Getting Ready For The 2019 Tax Filing Season

On January 7, 2019, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) announced that it will process tax returns beginning January 28, 2019 and provide refunds to taxpayers as scheduled despite the current government shutdown.

While full operation of the IRS cannot resume without appropriation of funds by Congress, Federal law (31 U.S.C. 1324) mandates that all tax refunds still due to taxpayers must be made through a permanent, indefinite appropriation. Thus while a significant number of IRS employees are furloughed and IRS functions severely limited under the current shutdown, taxpayers will still get their refunds.

The IRS will be recalling a significant portion of its workforce, currently furloughed as part of the government shutdown, to work. Additional details for the 2019 filing season will be included in an updated 2019 Lapsed Appropriations Contingency Plan to be released publicly in the coming days.

April 15th Filing Deadline.

The filing deadline to submit 2018 tax returns is Monday, April 15, 2019 for most taxpayers. Because of the Patriots’ Day holiday on April 15 in Maine and Massachusetts and the Emancipation Day holiday on April 16 in the District of Columbia, taxpayers who live in Maine or Massachusetts have until April 17, 2019 to file their returns but for everyone else, the filing deadline remains as Monday, April 15.

Since the IRS will begin processing tax returns on January 28th there is no advantage to filing tax returns on paper in early January instead of waiting for the IRS to begin accepting e-filed returns.  Nevertheless, it makes sense to start organizing your information early and so when the IRS filing systems open on January 28th, you are ready to submit your tax return right away.

Refunds in 2019.

Choosing e-file and direct deposit for refunds remains the fastest way to file an accurate income tax return and receive a refundThe IRS still anticipates issuing at least 90%of tax refunds in less than 21 days, but there are some important factors to keep in mind for taxpayers that could cause delay.  Under the Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes (PATH) Act which took into effect starting with the 2017 Tax Filing Season, the IRS is required to hold refunds for tax returns which include a claim of the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and the Additional Child Tax Credit (ACTC) until February 15, 2019. Also consider that it would still take several days for these refunds to be released and processed through financial institutions, and factoring in weekends, the current government shutdown and the President’s Day holiday, taxpayers claiming these credits may not have actual access to their refunds until the later part of February.

The status of your tax refund can be checked directly with IRS by using the Where’s My Refund? ‎on IRS.gov and the IRS2Go phone app.

Time Limits For Keeping Your Tax Records

Even though your 2018 income tax return is processed by the IRS and a refund is issued, that does not mean the IRS can later question or audit the tax return,  In fact the Statute Of Limitations allows the IRS three years to go back and audit your tax return.  That is why it’s a good idea to keep copies of your prior-year tax returns and supporting backup documentation for at least three years.

What Should You Do?

You know that at the Law Offices Of Jeffrey B. Kahn, P.C. we are always thinking of ways that our clients can save on taxes. If you are selected for an audit, stand up to the IRS by getting representation. Tax problems are usually a serious matter and must be handled appropriately so it’s important to that you’ve hired the best lawyer for your particular situation. The tax attorneys at the Law Offices Of Jeffrey B. Kahn, P.C. located in Orange County (Irvine), the San Francisco Bay Area (including San Jose and Walnut Creek) and elsewhere in California are highly skilled in handling tax matters and can effectively represent at all levels with the IRS and State Tax Agencies including criminal tax investigations and attempted prosecutions, undisclosed foreign bank accounts and other foreign assets, and unreported foreign income. Also if you are involved in cannabis, check out what our cannabis tax attorneys can do for you.